Geneaus

African American Genealogy and Spirituality in the U.S.

Godboat. An usual surname and many researchers may look into Godbout, Godbolt, etc. as an alternative spelling. The surname Godboat however does exist, while not many in numbers, and the ones you will find are either Whites from Canada, or African Americans down in the Florida and South Carolina area, one shouldn't rule out researching Godboat first before moving on to alternatives. 

My Godboats and Betheas are also rumored to be from the Hamer, SC area. Hamer sits on the border of North Carolina and South Carolina, slightly north of South of the Border. My great grandfather - Moses Bethea - married Sarah Godboat. I found this interesting article linking the Betheas to the Hamer family:

"Descendants of William Hamer, the family of William’s son John Hicks Hamer (1765-1842) and grandson Robert Cochran Hamer (1801-1878) lived in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina throughout the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This large family was interconnected through marriage with the Betheas, Cochrans, Thomases, and a number of other surnames Descendants of William Hamer, the family of William’s son John Hicks Hamer (1765-1842) and grandson Robert Cochran Hamer (1801-1878) lived in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina throughout the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This large family was interconnected through marriage with the Betheas, Cochrans, Thomases, and a number of other surnames.."  Hammer Family Papers 1765-1907 http://www.sc.edu/library/socar/uscs/2006/hamer06.html 

Sallie/Sarah Godboat

January 11, 2008

This weekend  I hit the road to South Carolina to find what my 80 year old cousin, in a thick SC accent, called Cotton (something) and Mt. Pleasant (something). I tell you the truth, I can hardly understand half of what my family in SC say! (laugh). I had decided the day before to look up Cotton (mind you, I had attempted to look up such a place before and found nothing that seemed correct). I found on the map Cotton Valley right at the border of  North Carolina and South Carolina, not too far from South of the Border.


So, with Garmin in tow, we programmed Cotton Valley and followed its directions. It took us to an area where the land stretched for miles. Flat, green, land. It was beautiful! We get the idea to go visit a church that we saw sitting in a huge field...the name of the church...Mt. Pleasant. What I had been looking for all this time!

I stopped some people that seemed to be going into the church, and asked if there was a cemetary nearby with the name Cotton. They directed about a mile down the road. In the background the choir was practicing and I took a photo (see below) of the church and the sun was shining directly above the cross, at that moment, my Egun were speaking to me -- telling me that I have arrived.


Photo by Ayo

Below are photos from Cotton Valley and Cotton Valley Cemetery.

Photo by Juana Llorens

Photo by Juana Llorens

Photo by Ayo

Photo by Juana Llorens

Photo by Ayo

Photo by Juana Llorens

Photo by Juana Llorens


On the sunny side of the street (song my grandmother Ella used to sing)


               

 

Grab your coat and get your hat
Leave your worries on the doorstep
Life can be so sweet
On the sunny side of the street

Can't you hear the pitter-pat
And that happy tune is your step
Life can be complete
On the sunny side of the street

I used to walk in the shade with my blues on parade
But I'm not afraid...this rover?s crossed over

If I never had a cent
I'd be rich as Rockefeller
Gold dust at my feet
On the sunny side of the street

(instrumental break)

I used to walk in the shade with them blues on parade
Now I'm not afraid... this rover has crossed over

Now if I never made one cent
I?ll still be rich as Rockefeller
There will be goldust at my feet
On the sunny
On the sunny, sunny side of the street

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